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Ahh...average. Temperatures return to normal next week

After a week of record-breaking heat and humidity, temperatures will return to normal next week, with highs in the 80s and lows in the 60s.
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After a weak of record heat, next week's mostly sunny skies with high temperatures in the mid- to upper-80s will seem just fine by comparison.

Lows will dip into the 60s at night, the National Weather Service says.

The heat wave didn't disappear for everyone. Summer's simmer continued to bake much of the U.S. on Saturday as the extreme heat was blamed for a number of deaths, power outages and problems with roads and rails, the Wall Street Journal reports.

WCCO tallied up a few of the notable stats from last week: It was the first time since 1988 that the Twin Cities has had two 100-degree days in one summer (and we had them twice in one week). There have been two record highs set since July 1. And the metro has had 16 90-degree or hotter days so far, when 13 is average for the whole summer.

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