Banks coming back home in apartment boom

Twin Cities banks are cashing in on the surge of multifamily construction, jostling to do business again with real estate developers, the Star Tribune reports. It's a sharp twist from the post-crash years when toxic concentrations of commercial real estate loans brought down so many small community banks and larger banks all but pulled out of construction and development lending.
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Twin Cities banks are cashing in on the surge of multifamily construction, jostling to do business again with real estate developers, the Star Tribune reports. It's a sharp twist from the post-crash years when toxic concentrations of commercial real estate loans brought down so many small community banks and larger banks all but pulled out of construction and development lending.

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