Battle over proposed marriage measure still too close to predict

With less than nine days before Minnesota voters head to the polls, the controversial ballot measure to ban same-sex marriage in the state is deadlocked, according to the newest Star Tribune Minnesota Poll. The new survey shows 48 percent of likely Minnesota voters support the constitutional amendment to define marriage as only between one man and one woman. Forty-seven percent say they're against the proposed measure.
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With less than nine days before Minnesota voters head to the polls, the controversial ballot measure to ban same-sex marriage in the state is deadlocked, according to the newest Star Tribune Minnesota Poll. The new survey shows 48 percent of likely Minnesota voters support the constitutional amendment to define marriage as only between one man and one woman. Forty-seven percent say they're against the proposed measure.

Minnesota law requires at least 50 percent of all ballots cast must vote "yes" to change the state Constitution.

The results are nearly identical to a KSTP/SurveyUSA poll earlier this month and a Minnesota Poll in September.

Click here, for a complete breakdown of the Oct. 23-25 Minnesota Poll results on the marriage amendment.

Pioneer Press notes both sides of the marriage amendment debate have spent millions of dollars trying to sway Minnesota voters.

The group trying to defeat the same-sex marriage ban in Minnesota are now airing a new television spot featuring John Kriesel, one of only four Republican state lawmakers in the House to oppose the ballot measure.

Watch the ad below:

Meanwhile, the Star Tribune poll also shows more than half of those surveyed support the proposed amendment to require Minnesota voters to show photo identification at the polls. Forty-one percent are against it and 6 percent are undecided.

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