Beekeepers say pesticide may be culprit in die-off of bees

A U of M researcher says when the pesticide is applied to the soil it's picked up by plants and gets into the pollen and nectar. Beekeepers want the Environmental Protection Agency to do more testing of the pesticide, which was approved in 2003.
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A U of M researcher says when the pesticide is applied to the soil it's picked up by plants and gets into the pollen and nectar. Beekeepers want the Environmental Protection Agency to do more testing of the pesticide, which was approved in 2003.

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