Bees attack day care group in St. Paul

A group of 11 day care children and two adults were attacked by a swarm of bees in St. Paul Wednesday. WCCO reports a young girl was stung about 30 times and was taken to the hospital.
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An aggressive swarm of bees went after a group of 11 day care children and two adults walking along Mississippi River Boulevard in St. Paul Wednesday. St. Paul Fire Marshall Steve Zaccard tells WCCO a young girl was stung at least 30 times and was taken to the hospital to be examined. Responding emergency crews were also stung.

Zaccard says rescue workers were stung in the same area a month ago when a woman fell off a bluff, the television station reports.

In Stillwater, KSTP-TV says a beekeeping ordinance was passed that allows residents to keep beehives. The ordinance does not allow more than five hives per property.

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