Behind the war over voter ID

The Washington Post takes a look at where a controversial issue stands in state capitols across the nation. Everywhere, the debate splits nearly evenly along party lines. Republicans argue its necessary to protect against fraud, but Democrats counter that concerns about fraud are just excuses to suppress voter turnout among minorities, the poor and the elderly.
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The Washington Post takes a look at where a controversial issue stands in state capitols across the nation. Everywhere, the debate splits nearly evenly along party lines. Republicans argue its necessary to protect against fraud, but Democrats counter that concerns about fraud are just excuses to suppress voter turnout among minorities, the poor and the elderly.

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Religious coalition encouraging followers to oppose voter ID

A coalition that includes Jewish, Muslim, and Christian leaders says it will encourage its 50,000 followers to oppose the voter ID amendment on Minnesota's ballot. Members of the group Prophetic Voices say requiring a government-issued photo ID would take votes away from poor people, the elderly, and students. Some say the push is tinged with racism. Supporters of the measure say it would guard against vote fraud.

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The measure advanced through a House committee on a party-line vote Monday. If the House and Senate pass the proposal, then voters in the November election will decide whether to amend the state constitution to require that all would-be voters present a photo ID before they cast a ballot.

Voter ID amendment advances at Capitol

Proposals for a constitutional amendment requiring photo IDs at polls are just a step away from reaching the House and Senate floors, MinnPost reports. Constitutional amendments, if approved by the Legislature, go straight to voters. They do not require Gov. Dayton's signature, so he cannot veto them.

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The American Civil Liberties Union of Minnesota is offering a $1,000 reward to anyone who can find a case of voter impersonation in the state during the last ten years. The group opposes the effort to put a voter ID requirement on Minnesota's ballot. Backers of the idea say it will reduce voter fraud. But the ACLU argues fraud is not a problem here.

Group: Voter ID requirement hurts Native Americans

A tribal advocacy group says new voter identification laws in a dozen states hinder the ability of some Native Americans to vote, the Associated Press reports. Among the issues is that some homes in tribal communities have no addresses, a new report says. The study cites other issues: "barriers of cost, logistics and distance to obtaining required IDs."