Bible cited by both supporters and critics of marriage amendment - Bring Me The News

Bible cited by both supporters and critics of marriage amendment

Religious involvement in the debate over the marriage amendment may be stronger in Minnesota than it's been in any of the 30 states that have voted on a definition of marriage. The state's largest denomination, the Catholic church, supports the amendment to define marriage as between a man and a woman. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and a number of Jewish synagogues oppose it.
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Religious involvement in the debate over the marriage amendment may be stronger in Minnesota than it's been in any of the 30 states that have voted on a definition of marriage. The state's largest denomination, the Catholic church, supports the amendment to define marriage as between a man and a woman. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and a number of Jewish synagogues oppose it.

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