Big money from outside Minnesota flows into 8th district race

So-called Super PACs are pouring money into the Iron Range district, where Republican Rep. Chip Cravaack will defend his seat against Democrats who think they have a chance to win it back. Cravaack won the seat after an upset victory over longtime Democratic incumbent Jim Oberstar.
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So-called Super PACs are pouring money into the Iron Range district, where Republican Rep. Chip Cravaack will defend his seat against Democrats who think they have a chance to win it back. Cravaack won the seat after an upset victory over longtime Democratic incumbent Jim Oberstar.

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