Bill would end 'use-it-or-lose-it' rule for FSA health care accounts

Republican Minnesota Rep. Erik Paulsen has sponsored legislation that would overturn a rule that stops many people from signing up for flexible spending accounts. FSA contributions which can boost your income because they aren't taxed, can be used for many medical expenses, but those contributions must be used before the end of the year, or they disappear.
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Republican Minnesota Rep. Erik Paulsen has sponsored legislation that would overturn a rule that stops many people from signing up for flexible spending accounts. FSA contributions which can boost your income because they aren't taxed, can be used for many medical expenses, but those contributions must be used before the end of the year, or they disappear.

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