Blank ballots could seal fate of marriage amendment

After so many fierce debates, months of campaigning and millions of dollars spent, the marriage amendment could be decided by people who leave the question blank on their ballots, MPR reports. A blank ballot counts as a "no" vote on the question of whether a marriage should be defined in the state constitution as between a man and woman. To be approved, the measure needs 50 percent of voters to vote "yes."
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After so many fierce debates, months of campaigning and millions of dollars spent, the marriage amendment could be decided by people who leave the question blank on their ballots, MPR reports. A blank ballot counts as a "no" vote on the question of whether a marriage should be defined in the state constitution as between a man and woman.

To be approved, the measure needs 50 percent of voters to vote "yes." So if recent polls are correct that the supporters and opponents of the measure are truly evenly divided, people who opt not to vote at all could help defeat the measure, MPR notes.

The Rochester Post Bulletin endeavors to explain why it is that a blank vote amounts to a "no" vote on Minnesota constitutional amendment measures. MinnPost has a great background primer on the marriage amendment if you still have nagging questions.

Voter turnout was steady to heavy at polling places across the state, and Secretary of State Mark Ritchie predicts Minnesota again could be No. 1 among states in voter turnout.

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