California wildfires destroy 1,500 buildings, prompt thousands to evacuate - Bring Me The News

California wildfires destroy 1,500 buildings, prompt thousands to evacuate

It's being called one of the worst firestorms in California history.
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Fire destroys home near Napa, California, on Monday. 

Fire destroys home near Napa, California, on Monday. 

Huge wildfires near California's famous wine country have destroyed more than 1,500 buildings as thousands of people are evacuated from their homes.

The fires – most of which started Sunday night – have burned at least 44,000 acres just north of Napa, officials said Monday, according to CNN.

Officials are conservatively reporting that at least 1,500 buildings, including peoples' homes, have been destroyed by the fires, The Associated Press says.

The devastation these fires caused in just a few hours has led the Los Angeles Times to call this one of the worst firestorms in history. 

An estimated 20,000 people have been evacuated, the AP notes. No deaths have been reported, but "numerous" people are hurt and some are missing. 

The fires are so destructive that California Gov. Edmund Brown declared a state of emergency Monday for Napa, Sonoma and Yuba counties. 

This means the California National Guard can start mobilizing to help. 

The declaration says the Tubbs and Atlas fires, which both started Sunday night, have "damaged critical infrastructure, threatened thousands of homes and caused the evacuation of residents." 

The Atlas fire has spread to 5,000 acres in Napa County, while the Tubbs fire had spread to 20,000 acres as of Monday morning, the California Fire website says

For the latest information on the wildfires, click here

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