CapX power line worries neighbors who are close, but not close enough

Many Minnesotans who live next to the CapX 2020 project worry it will tarnish their landscape and hurt their property values, maybe even their health, but because the project isn't touching their property, they aren't eligible for any compensation and have no power to negotiate.
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Many Minnesotans who live next to the CapX 2020 project worry it will tarnish their landscape and hurt their property values, maybe even their health, but because the project isn't touching their property, they aren't eligible for any compensation and have no power to negotiate.

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