Caribou Coffee caught up in widespread patent infringement lawsuits over Wi-Fi technology

A company called Innovatio is suing coffee, restaurant and hotel chains, claiming their wireless Internet hotspots are infringing on its patents. The company is asking for payments of a few thousand dollars. Tech giants Motorola and Cisco are firing back, saying their products don't infringe and that Innovatio's patents are invalid.
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A company called Innovatio is suing coffee, restaurant and hotel chains, claiming their wireless Internet hotspots are infringing on its patents. The company is asking for payments of a few thousand dollars. Tech giants Motorola and Cisco are firing back, saying their products don't infringe and that Innovatio's patents are invalid.

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