Cash floods into amendment campaigns

In just the last three days, nearly $1 million has been funneled into the campaigns on both sides of the two constitutional amendments on Minnesota's Election Day ballot, the Star Tribune reports. Among the donations, the Minnesota Family Council gave $500,000 to the effort supporting the amendment that would effectively ban gay marriage.
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In just the last three days, nearly $1 million has been funneled into the campaigns on both sides of the two constitutional amendments on Minnesota's Election Day ballot, the Star Tribune reports.

Among the donations, the Minnesota Family Council gave $500,000 to the Minnesota for Marriage effort supporting the amendment that would effectively ban gay marriage, the newspaper reports.

On the anti-amendment side, Minnesotans United for All Families received $125,000 from New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and $65,000 from CREDO SuperPAC, a California independent organization.

Some last-minute cash has flowed to the campaigns working the other amendment, which would require voters to bring a photo ID to the polls. Our Vote Our Future, opponents of that amendment, have received donations of $100,000 from America Votes, $12,000 from AARP, and $23,000 from St. Paul's TakeAction Political Fund, the Star Tribune reports. The pro-amendment ProtectMyVote.com has received gifts of about $8,000.

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