'Cookie poll' allows voters to cast their vote in buttercream

A bakery in Red Wing thinks cookie sales is the best indicator of who will be the next president. Hanisch Bakery's "cookie poll" has successfully predicted the outcome of each election since the Reagan v. Mondale race in 1984. Customers can vote by purchasing either "Romney" or "Obama" buttercream cookies.
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A bakery in Red Wing thinks cookie sales is the best indicator of who will be the next president. Hanisch Bakery's "cookie poll" has successfully predicted the outcome of each election since the Reagan v. Mondale race in 1984. Customers can vote by purchasing either "Romney" or "Obama" buttercream cookies.

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