Charlottesville anti-racism solidarity demonstrators march through Minneapolis streets

About 250 people took part in the rally Monday evening.
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A group of more than 200 anti-racism demonstrators walked through the streets of Minneapolis Monday evening in a show of solidarity with the Charlottesville counter-protesters.

The Solidarity with Anti-Racists in Charlottesville march met outside the Republican Party office in the city's Seward neighborhood. 

The goal was to show support for the people who protested the white nationalist "Unite the Right" rally Saturday – one of those counter-protesters was killed when a car drove through the crowd in a suspected domestic terror attack. Nineteen others were injured. 

Organizers of the Minneapolis solidarity march called the violence a "sickening crime," and accused President Donald Trump of emboldening racist white groups.

"The anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville were correct to oppose these forces, and everyone who loves peace, freedom and equality should continue to visibly oppose this racist and reactionary movement," organizers said.

After two days of mounting calls for him to do so, Trump singled out the "KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups" as "repugnant."

The march shut down streets

Minneapolis police estimated a crowd of about 250 people at the start of Monday's march.

The group took Franklin and Cedar avenues into downtown Minneapolis.

Once in the city center they stopped ata couple intersections – blocking traffic and the light rail lines from moving.

The demonstrators eventually thinned out, and by about 8:40 p.m., more than three hours after it started, the crowd had left. Police said nobody was arrested.

This march came one day after an impromptu solidarity gathering at Bde Maka Ska/Lake Calhoun.

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