Still falling: Minnesota has some of the cheapest gas prices in the US

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A gallon of gas in Minnesota is, on average, cheaper than 44 other states right now.

We're paying $1.93 a gallon for regular gas as of early Monday on the AAA Fuel Gauge Report, making it the sixth-cheapest in the entire nation. (For comparison, the national average is at $2.13.)

Monday's price is a 7-cent fall from a week ago, and continues what's been a staggering plummet since September. You're paying $1.35 less per gallon than you were four months ago. (Note: You can check out the average mid, premium and diesel prices by clicking here.)

Take a look at the decline.Here's a look at how it compares throughout the state:

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  • Duluth: $1.92
  • Minneapolis-St. Paul: $1.91
  • Rochester: $1.94
  • St. Cloud: $1.90

On Twin Cities Gas Prices, a few people had reported snagging as low as $1.66 a gallon in the state (one at a Sam's Club in Fridley, the other a Costco in Coon Rapids).

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How do we compare?

Missouri is currently the cheapest at $1.73 for a regular gallon; New York is the most expensive (of the 48 contiguous states) at $2.62 a gallon.

To put that "expensive" gas into perspective: In June, the national average for a gallon bumped up to about $3.68 – Minnesota was about a dime cheaper at the time.

Gas prices have fallen so far, some of the most expensive fuel in the country is still almost $1 cheaper than it was just a few months ago.

How is this affecting things?

The main benefit to the cheap gas prices, some argue, is it means regular people are spending less on fuel – and therefore have more money to spend other places.

But it's not the only thing we've seen be affected.

Here's a look at some repercussions.

  • USA Today has a list of "winners" and "losers" when gas is cheap.
  • Fortune says that extra money not being spent on gas may help lessen the impact of wages not going up much recently.
  • How much exactly? CNN Money says it's about $500 of savings per household. When added up, that's a $62 billion "stimulus injection."
  • Car travel in the U.S. has been declining for the past decade or so – but that might change now that gas is cheap, the Washington Post explains.
  • NPR reports sales of SUVs, trucks and luxury vehicles have increased since gas prices began dropping.
  • Cheaper gas has oil companies on edge, but it's really taken a bite out of the small- and mid-sized oil companies, according to CNBC.

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