Consumer watchdogs question Minn. colleges' contract with debit card co. - Bring Me The News

Consumer watchdogs question Minn. colleges' contract with debit card co.

Minnesota State Colleges and universities are being scrutinized by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group over a contract with private financial company Higher One. The consumer watchdog claims Higher One pushes students into using debit cards with sneaky fees that "eat up students' financial aid awards."
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Minnesota State Colleges and universities are being scrutinized by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group over a contract with private financial company Higher One. The consumer watchdog claims Higher One pushes students into using debit cards with sneaky fees that "eat up students' financial aid awards."

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