Country churches suffer as rural areas lose people - Bring Me The News

Country churches suffer as rural areas lose people

A growing number of rural Midwestern churches -- where generations have been baptized, married and buried -- are closing their doors as rural America loses residents to cities and suburbs. "There’s a kind of sadness to see the rural decline,” one observer says.
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A growing number of rural Midwestern churches -- where generations have been baptized, married and buried -- are closing their doors as rural America loses residents to cities and suburbs. "There’s a kind of sadness to see the rural decline,” one observer says.

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