Appeals court nixes most contempt counts in Minn. terror case

The Associated Press reports the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has thrown out 19 of the 20 contempt-of-court citations against one of the Rochester women convicted of funneling money to a terrorist group in Somalia. The three-judge panel sent the case back to Chief U.S. District Judge Michael Davis for further proceedings.
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The Associated Press reports the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has thrown out 19 of the 20 contempt-of-court citations against one of the Rochester women convicted of funneling money to a terrorist group in Somalia. The three-judge panel sent the case back to Chief U.S. District Judge Michael Davis for further proceedings.

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