Dayton names Appeals Judge Wright to state Supreme Court

Gov. Mark Dayton on Monday appointed Minnesota Court of Appeals Judge Wilhelmina Wright to the state Supreme Court. The 48-year-old St. Paul resident will be the first black woman to serve on the state's highest court.
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Gov. Mark Dayton has named Minnesota Court of Appeals Judge Wilhelmina Wright Wilhelmina Wright to the state Supreme Court, the Associated Press reports.

The 48-year-old St. Paul resident will be the first black woman to serve on the state's highest court, the AP reports.

Wright takes the seat vacated by retiring Justice Helen Meyer.

The appointment is the first by a Democratic governor since Rudy Perpich in 1991, Fox 9 notes.

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