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Dayton signs reinsurance waiver so health insurance will cost less for many next year - Bring Me The News

Dayton signs reinsurance waiver so health insurance will cost less for many next year

He's still not happy about MinnesotaCare funding.
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Tina Smith (pictured left) is favorite to be named the interim senator by Gov. Dayton.

Gov. Mark Dayton has signed a federal waiver for the state's reinsurance program. 

This finalizes the reinsurance program and removes any questions about the health insurance rates officials announced earlier this month.

In a statement, Dayton said the reinsurance waiver will lower 2018 health insurance premiums by an average of 20 percent for the 166,000 Minnesotans who buy insurance on the individual market. 

People can start browsing insurance plans online through MNsure now, but the first day of enrollment isn't until Nov. 1. 

But this waiver means no federal funding for MinnesotaCare – the health insurance program that helps about 100,000 low-income families in Minnesota. President Donald Trump has said he wants to scrap the cost-sharing subsidies that provide Minnesota with $369 million in funding, the Pioneer Press says

But people who have MinnesotaCare don't need to worry. 

"I assure everyone, who is now covered by MinnesotaCare, that we have sufficient funding to operate this program at its current levels through Calendar Year 2018. Their present health insurance will not be disrupted next year," Dayton said in a statement. 

The governor adds that by signing the reinsurance wavier he has "not waived" Minnesota's right to federal funding for MinnesotaCare. 

Dayton says he remains "strongly opposed" to Trump's proposed cuts to MinnesotaCare (it's something both Minnesota Democrats and Republicans have agreed on), and will continue working with Minnesota lawmakers to keep federal funding for the program.

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