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Dead female bugs used to lure lusty male ash borers

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture hopes a sticky new tool will help in its fight against the emerald ash borer. STUC (Sticky Traps Using Cadavers) is designed to lure male ash borer beetles into a sticky trap as they look for a mate.
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The Minnesota Department of Agriculture hopes a sticky new tool will help in its fight against the emerald ash borer. STUC (Sticky Traps Using Cadavers) is designed to lure male ash borer beetles into a sticky trap as they look for a mate.

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