Deadline is Thursday to pick up late season Minnesota wolf hunting licenses

The deadline is looming for hunters and trappers selected in the lottery for Minnesota's late wolf hunting season to buy their license. Any licenses not purchased by then will go on sale to the general public starting Nov. 19 at noon on a first-come, first-served basis.
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The deadline is looming for hunters and trappers selected in the lottery for Minnesota's late wolf hunting season to buy their licenses, the Star Tribune reported.

Any licenses not purchased by then will go on sale to the general public starting Nov. 19 at noon on a first-come, first-served basis, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said. Additional licenses left over after that will go on sale for hunters and trappers Nov. 21.

So far, the state has sold 1,000 of the 1,800 late-season hunting licenses. More than 500 of the 600 wolf trapping licenses have also been sold.

More than 100 wolves were taken in the first eight days early hunting season, which was Nov. 2.

The early season has a quota of 200 kills.

Two national groups came up short in their bids to convince the Minnesota State Supreme Court to block the wolf hunt.

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