Demand for manufacturers felt at Minneapolis trade school - Bring Me The News

Demand for manufacturers felt at Minneapolis trade school

"You didn't build that" is something the burgeoning number of students at Dunwoody College of Technology won't have to hear. Enrollment at the Minneapolis school is at a 15-year high as manufacturers - especially in Minnesota's medical device industry - clamor for more skilled workers. Dunwoody has even added a six month fast-track program to help meet the demand.
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"You didn't build that" is something the burgeoning number of students at Dunwoody College of Technology won't have to hear. Enrollment at the Minneapolis school is at a 15-year high as manufacturers - especially in Minnesota's medical device industry - clamor for more skilled workers. Dunwoody has even added a six month fast-track program to help meet the demand.

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