Despite flooding, Duluth tourism officials say city open for business

Tourism officials in Duluth said despite the record breaking flooding that devastated parts of the city, restaurants and other tourism-related businesses in the city are open for business. Some officials in the city and surrounding areas are worried about how the damage will affect the region's $800 million tourism industry.
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Tourism officials in Duluth said despite the record breaking flooding that devastated parts of the city, restaurants and other tourism-related businesses in the city are open for business. Some officials in the city and surrounding areas are worried about how the damage will affect the region's $800 million tourism industry.

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