DFL lawmakers: No more borrowing against the state's tobacco settlement

One method off the table -- selling more tobacco bonds. House Democrats say the state cannot borrow against its multi-billion dollar tobacco settlement again.
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One method off the table -- selling more tobacco bonds. House Democrats say the state cannot borrow against its multi-billion dollar tobacco settlement again.

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