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DNR pushing for $7M to build Asian carp barrier

The DNR says there's evidence that the carp, which can grow to 60 pounds and outmuscle native species for food, are in the St. Croix River. However, Wisconsin DNR officials say the barriers aren't 100 percent effective and it may be a worthless effort at this point.
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The DNR says there's evidence that the carp, which can grow to 60 pounds and outmuscle native species for food, are in the St. Croix River. However, Wisconsin DNR officials say the barriers aren't 100 percent effective and it may be a worthless effort at this point.

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