Does downtown Minneapolis have too much parking?

City planners are mulling how to transform parking lots into the kind of dense, urban development needed to meet the city's aim of doubling the downtown population over the next decade. There are at least 140 surface parking lots scattered around downtown, some of which take up entire an entire block.
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Some city officials say downtown Minneapolis is drowning in unsightly – and frequently unused – parking lots, which stunt growth, the Star Tribune reports. As part of a review of downtown lots, Minneapolis recently won a $43,250 grant from the Met Council to examine the large surface parking lots near the Metrodome light-rail station, the Strib says.

St. Paul English teacher Chris Keimig takes photos of frequently deserted parking lots, and he collects them on his blog, "Empty Lots," along with what he considers other missed opportunities in city planning.

At the University of Minnesota, the light-rail could reduce on-street parking in the Stadium Village area by 42 percent, the Minnesota Daily reports.

A 2003 report by Transit for Livable Communities titled "The Myth of Free Parking" notes that abundant parking discourages people from carpooling and using public transit.

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