Update: State Department says fewer than 60,000 visas have been canceled, not 100,000

It's not clear how many people with visas were sent back to their home country.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

Tens of thousands of visas have been revoked since President Donald Trump issued his executive order temporarily banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.

During a federal court hearing in Virginia Friday, an attorney with the Justice Department said more than 100,000 visas have been revoked since Jan. 27, the Washington Post and CNN report. However, the State Department disagreed with the attorney's number, saying fewer than 60,000 visas that have been canceled, according to The Associated Press.

Under the travel ban, anyone who has a nonimmigrant or immigrant visa and is a citizen of one of seven countries (Somalia, Yemen, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Iraq and Iran) is not allowed into the United States for 90 days. And those who are already in the U.S. won't be able to leave and come back.

A spokesperson with the State Department told the Huffington Post these visas were "provisionally revoked, meaning that is something that could be reversed" when the travel ban expires on April 27. To put the number of revoked visas into perspective, the spokesperson told the publication they issued 11 million immigrant and nonimmigrant visas in 2015.

The Department of Justice attorney on Friday did not say how many people with visas were sent back to their home countries as a result of the travel ban, the Washington Post says, while CNN reports no legal permanent residents who were returning to the U.S. have been denied entry, according to the attorney.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection's website shows that as of Wednesday afternoon, 1,136 travelers were denied boarding to come to the U.S. and 87 people have been granted visa waivers. Earlier this week, Trump tweeted that out of 325,000 people, only 109 were detained and held for further questioning over the weekend.

The immigration order

The Trump Administration says the temporary freeze – which also bans refugees from coming to the U.S. for 120 days – lets federal officials develop a stricter vetting process for ensuring that terrorists are kept out of the U.S.

Prior to the order, about 900 refugees were expected to resettle in Minnesota alone over the next 120 days through the seven organizations in Minnesota that do resettlement work.

On Wednesday, Minnesota joined a lawsuit arguing the limits President Trump put on refugees and immigrants last week are unconstitutional.

USA Today reported earlier this week the Department of Homeland Security will allow 872 refugees to enter the U.S. this week, anyways. And the Washington Post reported Friday the government seems to be considering allowing people who were turned away over the weekend entry into the U.S. on a case-by-case basis.

Next Up

Sergio Romo

Twins decline 2021 option on Sergio Romo

The Twins begin a potential overhaul in the bullpen.

high school football

'Scalpel approach' gives MN schools chance to keep playing sports

County infection rates are no longer the only thing that matters.

CJ-AHyggeHoliday-Photo2

With the help of HVAC, Circus Juventas will host its first holiday shows

After months of canceled classes and shows, Circus Juventas is hosting its first ever holiday show, with safety precautions.

Cameron Dantzler

Vikings send Cameron Dantzler to COVID-19/reserve list

Dantzler's placement leaves the Vikings paper-thin at cornerback heading into Green Bay.

peterson fischbach

Elections 2020 preview: 7th Congressional District

Will Collin Peterson hang on for yet another term?

Zimmer and Hunter

Zimmer explains why he called Hunter's neck injury a 'tweak'

The coach also said Dalvin Cook should return from injury this week.

magazines

60 charged in magazine scam that netted $300M

It's being called the largest elder fraud scheme in the country.

Screen Shot 2020-10-28 at 10.30.23 AM

The Star Tribune is shutting down City Pages

The free newspaper was bought by the Star Tribune in 2015.

billy's on grand

Coronavirus: Billy's on Grand will close for winter

The restaurant is among a growing list of eateries to close for the winter months.

Related

ACLU's lawsuit demands to know if anyone has been detained at MSP due to the travel ban

It's one of 13 lawsuits filed by ACLUs across the U.S. this week

The State Department says U.S. citizens have been killed, kidnapped and carjacked in Mexico

The State Department says U.S. citizens have been victims of violence in certain parts of the country.

10 numbers to know about the travel ban and refugees in Minnesota

10 numbers you should know about immigrants and refugees in the U.S. and Minnesota.

Black bicyclists are likely stopped by police more than white bicyclists, report says

It's likely that black bicyclists are stopped and cited more often for minor violations than white bicyclists.

Update: Federal government responds to WA, MN lawsuit; arguments coming Tuesday

The federal government's response called the executive order a "lawful exercise."

UPDATE: Actually, 100K people showed up to the Women's March in St. Paul

"The rhetoric of the past election cycle has insulted, demonized, and threatened many of us."

Minnesota joins lawsuit challenging Trump's immigration order

The lawsuit says the country's new limits on refugees and immigrants are unconstitutional.

Search warrants say a woman slapped the squad car before Justine Damond was killed

It's not clear if that's the loud sound one of the officers heard.