Updated:
Original:

Don't fret: Blue Monday is over

Author:

As if the weather isn't gloomy enough, Monday, Jan. 6 is the most depressing day of the year, according to many media reports including The Today Show. The claim is based on an analysis of tweets by Upbeat, a British protein drink company.

The three-year study of millions of tweets calls the first Monday of January "the most downbeat day for Brits."

The study says Monday's gloomy feelings are due to lack of light, the back-to-work and school tradition, and possible debt from holiday spending.

The Huffington Post added that guilt-related tweets are supposedly five times higher and weather complaints are six times higher than normal on the first Monday of January.

KARE 11 noted that if people feel blue, it may be due to lack of sleep or lagging New Year's resolutions.

WCCO quoted psychologist S.Charles Schulz, professor and chair of the University of Minnesota psychology department.

“I think that there is a change in mood, from being in elevated and excited and connected with your friends and family over the holidays and now that’s over,” Schulz said.

A lot of media reports tried to provide context. Some said feeling blue is just common sense given the cold weather, dark days and return to work and school.

BuzzFeed has been trying to debunk the whole idea, calling it bad science and a marketing ploy.

It says the hashtag "BlueMonday" is used to sell products supposed to make you feel better.

"Blue Monday" is different from real depression. The Today Show advised being evaluated if you feel blue for more than two weeks. Symptoms of depression include sleeping or eating poorly, losing pleasure in life, and a lack of motivation.

Minnesotans who need urgent help can call Crisis Connection at 612-379-6363, or 1-866-379-6363. It is free and open 24 hours a day.

A national hotline, with an easy to remember number, is 1-800-SUICIDE. It is free to call, confidential, and open 24 hours a day.

Next Up

2048px-The_Weeknd_with_hand_in_the_air_performing_live_in_Hong_Kong_in_November_2018

Ladies and gentlemen, The Weeknd has canceled his St. Paul show

He's made changes to his 2022 tour that involves scrapping his Xcel Energy Center gig.

Pixabay - police lights, tape

Man released from custody after admitting to fatal shooting in ND

Authorities said there is no threat to the public.

rochester-water-tower

MN water tower in the running for Tank of the Year

It was the only water tank to receive more than 5,000 votes.

first snow

Any sign of snow in the forecast for Minnesota?

The stars could align for some flurries in northern Minnesota this week, but that's about it.

Flickr - 14 year old vaccine shot - Navy Medicine

Walz announces $200 reward for kids 12-17 who get COVID shots

Those ages have the lowest vaccination rates among all eligible age groups.

Screen Shot 2021-10-15 at 10.01.55 PM

Police still searching for suspect who opened fire at Plymouth movie theater

It sparked a partial evacuation of the Emagine Willow Creek theater.

covid, vaccine

Minnesota's COVID-19 update for Monday, October 18

Hospitalizations have surpassed 1,000 in the latest update.

Gully Boys van stolen Twitter pic 1

Mpls. band Gully Boys' van stolen, with all their gear inside

They're asking Twin Cities residents to be on the lookout for the silver van.

Related

Bank working on fix as Somalis fret over money transfer shutdown

Minnesota Somalis are worried after news that the money transfer company that handles most of the community's transactions with Somalia is shutting down amid fears that it may have a hand in routing cash to terrorists. Federal officials say Somalis in America send $100 million a year back to relatives in Somalia, which lacks a formal banking system.

State officials fret over Minnesota student loan defaults

More than 9,500 higher education students in Minnesota have defaulted on federal student loans in the past three years, new data from the U.S. Department of Education shows, the Star Tribune reports. The overall default rate is lower than the national average, but state officials are still eyeing the statistics with concern.