Don't worry everyone, Twitter is really gonna start cracking down on creepy upskirt photos now

11 years into its existence, Twitter is taking a tougher stance on creepshots.
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Twitter, despite all the criticism about enabling harassment and abuse, has never publicly released a safety calendar, essentially a timetable for new rules to discourage crappy behavior.

But that changed this week, when Twitter published its timeline for upcoming safety policies.

And good news! Eleven years into its existence, the app's safety execs are going to really start cracking down on things like upskirt photos.

Yes among the "upcoming changes" to Twitter's rules is an expanded definition of what's considered "nonconsensual nudity." 

To "err on the side of protecting victims" – especially since many might not know a photo of their body was published – Twitter is cracking down on the person who posted it. That includes upskirt photos and hidden camera shots, Twitter explains.

And this new, no-funny-business Twitter will start enforcing this rule ... next week, on Oct. 27.

Wait – so what was the policy before?

Twitter doesn't include any mention of "nonconsensual nudity" in its help center rules, though there is a page explaining its ban on promoting adult or sexual services. (That includes no porn, no sex toys, and no "erotic massage services.")

But the fact that Twitter feels the need to change its policy regarding creepshots means there was something.

So what exactly were the rules?

WIRED obtained a copy of an internal Twitter email detailing the safety changes. The "nonconsensual nudity" section includes a comparison.

The current approach is to require whoever posted the inappropriate content (even if they didn't realize what they were doing) to delete the tweets. Then they were suspended temporarily. Repeated offenses led to a permanent ban.

This new, updated approach will see Twitter "immediately and permanently suspend any account" that is the source of the nonconsensual image or video, the email WIRED obtained says. The ban hammer will also come down on anyone who's using that type of content to harass other tweeters. 

Any time a tweet is flagged as nonconsensual, Twitter will do a "full account review" and, if it appears "dedicated" to that type of behavior, it will be suspended immediately.

A lot more changes are coming

That is just one change to the safety rules planned by Twitter, as it reels most recently from a boycott staged in response to the temporary suspension of actress Rose McGowan. Her account had been disabled after she accused film producer Harvey Weinstein of rape. (Twitter said it was because one of her tweets contained a phone number.)

"Far too often in the past we’ve said we’d do better and promised transparency but have fallen short in our efforts," Twitter said.

In addition to the nonconsensual content, Twitter will introduce a better process for appealing suspensions starting Oct. 27.

In November, a large update promises stricter rules around groups that promote violence (their accounts will be suspended), or the use of "hateful imagery" and symbols (they won't be allowed in avatars or headers anymore, and tweeted images won't automatically show.)

That comes Nov. 13. Nine days later, you won't be able to use hateful, abusive display names.

Here's Twitter's full safety calendar, which goes until January. 

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey had a lot to say ahead of the safety calendar's release, promising a "more aggressive stance" after realizing they're "*still* not doing enough."

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