Drought emergency grips Wis.; SW Minn. crops hurting, too

There was some rain in southwest Minnesota Friday, but not enough to help much in what has become a serious drought in that part of the state. Crops and livestock are hurting. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker toured farms on Friday after declaring a drought emergency statewide.
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Crops in the southwest part of the state are desperate for a long gentle Minnesota rain, MPR reports. Some sprinkles Friday weren't enough to put a dent in the drought there, where livestock are also suffering.

Parts of northwest, southwest and southeast Minnesota are experiencing moderate drought, MPR says. Some areas have had only a third of an inch of rain or so over the past month. Still, the state is generally faring better than some others, including Wisconsin.

Gov. Scott Walker is touring farms in southern Wisconsin to assess crop damage from the ongoing drought, the Associated Press reports. Walker's first stop Friday was the Ehrhart farm in Burlington, where Jeff Ehrhart says corn has suffered the most from the hot and dry conditions.

Ehrhart showed Walker yellowed corn that would not recover.

There may be one upside to the drought, the Associated Press reports. The dry, hot weather concentrates flavor in some fruits and vegetables, making peppers spicier, melons sweeter, and radishes more potent.

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