Drug company payments to doctors are falling ahead of new reporting rules

In the first in a three-part series, the Pioneer Press delves into payments that pharmaceutical companies make to Minnesota doctors. The paper reports such payments have fallen significantly because of financial pressures, the rising costs of developing new drugs, and more difficulty in finding doctors who will accept the fees. And, starting next year, drug companies and device makers will have to share data on such fees with the federal government.
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In the first in a three-part series, the Pioneer Press delves into payments that pharmaceutical companies make to Minnesota doctors. The paper reports such payments have fallen significantly because of financial pressures, the rising costs of developing new drugs, and more difficulty in finding doctors who will accept the fees. And, starting next year, drug companies and device makers will have to share data on such fees with the federal government.

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