Convicted felon in Duluth gets 15-month sentence for ineligible voting

A convicted felon has received a 15-month sentence for a crime that usually results in probation, according to the Duluth News Tribune. Antonio Vassel Brown, who has been convicted of multiple felonies, will serve the time concurrently with another sentence. He's one of six people charged with ineligible voting in St. Louis County.
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A convicted felon has received a 15-month sentence for a crime that usually results in probation, according to the Duluth News Tribune. Antonio Vassel Brown, who has been convicted of multiple felonies, will serve the time concurrently with another sentence. He's one of six people charged with ineligible voting in St. Louis County.

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