Duluth man charged with using fake money at a kid's Kool-Aid stand - Bring Me The News

Duluth man charged with using fake money at a kid's Kool-Aid stand

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A Duluth man faces charges after being accused of using fake money at a child's Kool-Aid stand and at a garage sale.

Superior police tell The Forum they got a call saying a man and woman had used two fake $20 bills at a garage sale.

The suspects used one bill to buy an item worth $1, and another bill to buy something worth $2, the complaint says.

The next day, a similar incident happened in Lake Nebagamon, which is southeast of Superior.

A man – who fit the description of the garage sale suspect – used a fake $20 bill at a kid's Kool-Aid stand. The Superior Telegram says the man exchanged the counterfeit money for a drink and real bills.

That fake bill's serial number also matched one of the bills used at the garage sale.

Based on pictures, victims in both cases identified the suspect as 46-year-old Steven Alan Wakefield.

Court records show he's facing two felony charges of forgery. He'll be back in court in September.

This isn't a new issue.

Earlier this year, law enforcement in the Twin Cities warned people and businesses to watch out for bogus $100 bills.

People had been using prop money – the kind you might find in movies – in real life. The bills had the words "Motion Picture Use Only" printed on the top.

There have been similar cases in Prior Lake, Grand Forks, as well as several other cities.

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