Duluth man dies in fracking accident in ND

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A Duluth man was killed at a hydraulic fracturing site Saturday in western North Dakota, the Duluth News Tribune reports.

Mike Krajewski, 49, a father of three and Air Force veteran, died at an oil field site about 24 miles north of Watford City, N.D., the newspaper reported. A preliminary report indicated he may have been hit by a pipe that came loose, the News Tribune said.

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration is investigating.

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a controversial oil-extraction method that uses sand and water under high pressure to create cracks in rock to get at oil. Proponents say it is valuable technology that allows the nation to tap oil that would otherwise be trapped below the surface. Critics say it has environmental consequences that are only beginning to be seen.

North Dakota's oil boom has been fueled largely by fracking. North Dakota has become the fastest-growing state because of the growth in the oil fields.

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