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Duluth mayor threatens to close casino over revenue fight

A federal judge ruled the Fond-du-Lac Ojibwe Band no longer needs to share revenue from its casino with the city. The city has appealed the decision and now is apparently threatening to shut down the casino if the ruling stands. Mayor Don Ness tells Minnesota Public Radio the casino can't operate without the city's written consent.
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A federal judge ruled the Fond-du-Lac Ojibwe Band no longer needs to share revenue from its casino with the city. The city has appealed the decision and now is apparently threatening to shut down the casino if the ruling stands. Mayor Don Ness tells Minnesota Public Radio the casino can't operate without the city's written consent.

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