Duluth to visitors: C'mon in, the water’s gone

Duluth is accessible and very much open for the tourists it depends on every summer, city officials say. But there has been a deluge of visitor cancellations, and the tourism industry is battling the misconception that the city is not safe after record flooding last week. Those impressions linger even though 99 percent of the community is in decent condition and unsafe areas are barricaded, Mayor Don Ness said.
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Duluth is accessible and very much open for the tourists it depends on every summer, city officials say. But there has been a deluge of visitor cancellations, and the tourism industry is battling the misconception that the city is not safe after record flooding last week. Those impressions linger even though 99 percent of the community is in decent condition and unsafe areas are barricaded, Mayor Don Ness said.

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