Dupre once again attempts his quest to summit Alaska’s Mount McKinley

Lonnie Dupre of Grand Marais hopes the third time's a charm as he tries to become the first person to reach the top of Alaska's Mount McKinley in January 2013, the Duluth News Tribune reports. Dupre, 51, will begin his solo winter climb in December.
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Lonnie Dupre of Grand Marais hopes the third time's a charm as he tries to become the first person to reach the top of Alaska's Mount McKinley in January 2013, the Duluth News Tribune reports. Dupre, 51, will begin his solo winter climb in December.

Dupre fell short of Denali's 20,320-foot peak -- the highest point in North America -- in 2012 and 2011 because of severe weather. He called off his second attempt earlier this year after hurricane-force winds pinned him at 14,200 feet.

He made it to 17,200 feet on his first attempt last year.

Click here, to follow Dupre's current expedition.

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Update: Lonnie Dupre reaches 14,200 feet on Mt. McKinley

Lonnie Dupre is about 6,000 feet away from his record attempt on Mount McKinley. The Duluth News Tribune reports the Grand Marais climber reached 14,200 feet late Saturday. He planned to rest on New Year's Day at a place called Windy Corner. Dupre wants to be the first solo person in January to reach the highest peak in North America, known as Denali. He made it to 17,200 feet on his first attempt last year.

Update: Lonnie Dupre reaches 11,200 feet on Mt. McKinley

Grand Marais climber Lonnie Dupre continues his journey up Mt. McKinley. He is up to 11,200 feet after spending two days huddled in a snow cave because of poor visibility. Dupre is trying to be the first solo person to climb North America's tallest mountain in January. He attempted the same record climb last year, but bad weather forced him to turn around.

Grand Marais climber going for Mt. McKinley summit record

Lonnie Dupre, of Grand Marais, hopes to be successful with his second attempt to become the first solo climber to summit Alaska's Mount McKinley in January. According to the Duluth News Tribune, Dupre spent 22 days alone on North America's highest mountain when a storm kept him from reaching the top on his first try last year.

Two-day climb stands between Dupre and summit of Denali

Grand Marais adventurer Lonnie Dupre is waiting out strong winds and minus-50 temperatures before beginning the end of his climb. The Duluth News Tribune says he's about two days from the summit. If he makes it, he'll be the first person in history to reach the summit alone in January.