E. coli closes a popular Minneapolis beach

E. coli can come from a number of different sources – including poop, farm runoff, or even soil.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

High levels of bacteria has closed a popular Minneapolis beach.

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) closed the Lake Hiawatha Beach Tuesday because E. coli bacteria "exceeded state specified guidelines," an email statement says.

E. coli, of course, can come from a number of different sources – including human poop, bird poop, farm runoff, or even soil.

When bacteria levels are too high, it can make people sick. That's why the MPRB monitors bacteria at the city's beaches weekly from June through August, and will close them if bacteria levels are high.

No illnesses were reported as a result of swimming at the Lake Hiawatha Beach, MPRB says. The beach will reopen once bacteria levels are within the state guidelines. They noted all other public beaches and the Webber Natural Swimming Pool are still open.

The park board says bacteria typically gets elevated at beaches after it rains a lot, and it will return to normal levels within 24-48 hours. The Minnesota Department of Health says bacteria levels can also rise if the water gets contaminated by a sewage pipe break.

For information on bacteria monitoring at other beaches in Minnesota, click here.

Next Up

Andrelton Simmons / Minnesota Twins

Twins sign Andrelton Simmons to one-year deal

The former Angels shortstop is a four-time Gold Glove winner.

covid, vaccine

Minnesotans eligible for COVID shots only need to pre-register once for vaccine lottery

This is good news for people worried that they'd need to sign up every week.

police lights

2 people charged in separate Minneapolis homicides that happened hours apart

A woman is accused of stabbing a man in the chest over $60, while a man is accused of accidentally shooting a victim on the man's birthday.

House for sale

Despite pandemic, Twin Cities housing market set records in 2020

Sales were up 7.7% in 2020 compared to the year before.

Target store inside

Target unveils 'limited-edition' home, lifestyle collection with Levi Strauss

The new collection will be available in some stores and everyone online Feb. 28.

Tim Walz

Walz's $52.4 billion budget increases school spending, raises taxes on wealthy

He says the budget will help level the playing field and ensure all Minnesotans have a fair shot at economic recovery,

Screen Shot 2021-01-26 at 12.55.00 PM

Pictures from Minnesota GOP's Deadwood retreat show no masks, no distancing

The pictures were shared in Chair Jennifer Carnahan's latest email newsletter.

Alexus Norberg

Search for girl, 14, missing from St. Cloud

The teen left her home without her parents' permission.

coronavirus, covid-19

Here is Minnesota's COVID-19 update for Tuesday, January 26

The health departments provided new data daily at 11 a.m.

Related

E. coli closes a popular Minneapolis beach

E. coli can come from a number of different sources – including poop, farm runoff, or even soil.

High levels of E. coli close Minneapolis beach

Theodore Wirth Lake Beach in Minneapolis has been closed temporarily after it tested positive for E. coli bacteria that exceeded state guidelines. The rise in bacteria levels is likely caused by more birds at the lake since the start of migration season. No illnesses have been reported. The lake will be re-tested Wednesday.

Bde Maka Ska St. Thomas Beach

Rise in E. coli levels prompts closing of 3 Minneapolis beaches

Beaches usually re-open with 24-48 hours after bacteria-related closings.

E-coli bacteria shutting down beaches in Duluth, Minneapolis

Recent warm weather and heavy rains may have contributed to high levels of e-coli bacteria at some Minnesota beaches. Duluth officials have advised people to stay out of the water at three beaches and Minneapolis closed a Lake Harriet beach.

lake hiawatha

Some beaches closed temporarily after heavy rain, goose poop

Minneapolis closes two beaches due to high-than-recommended levels of E. coli.

Elevated levels of E. coli bacteria pose threat at main Duluth beach

For the second time this summer, beach goers are urged to stay out of the water at the main beach along Park Point in Duluth. The Minnesota Department of Health issued a warning to avoid contact with water at the beach due to elevated levels of E. coli bacteria.