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Eagle population soaring in Minnesota

An eagle project manager with the National Park Service told the Star Tribune officials counted 36 nests along the Mississippi River between Elk River and Hastings. That's up from 28 last year and 11 when aerial surveys began in 2006. The continued growth indicates the river is producing plenty of food for the majestic birds.
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An eagle project manager with the National Park Service told the Star Tribune officials counted 36 nests along the Mississippi River between Elk River and Hastings. That's up from 28 last year and 11 when aerial surveys began in 2006. The continued growth indicates the river is producing plenty of food for the majestic birds.

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