Early freeze may hit Minnesota's crops hard

he overnight freeze hit before their major crops were fully mature -- in fact, the latest agricultural report says only about 10 percent of the state's corn and soybean crops were ready.
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he overnight freeze hit before their major crops were fully mature -- in fact, the latest agricultural report says only about 10 percent of the state's corn and soybean crops were ready.

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Officials tallying impact of freeze on Minnesota's crops

The low temperatures will likely hurt corn and soybean yields this year. Statewide, only 46 percent of corn is in good condition, while 43 percent of soybeans are in good condition.

Minnesota crops weather the storms

Most of Minnesota's corn and soybean crops continue to thrive, despite last week's torrential rain and destructive weather. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports 83 percent of Minnesota corn is rated in good or excellent condition. As for soybeans, 74 percent of the acres are in good or excellent shape.

Last year's Minnesota corn crop comes in at record $7 billion

Even though production was down, Minnesota's corn crop was worth a best-ever $7 billion. The estimate from the U.S. Department of Agriculture tops the previous record the year before. The state's soybean crop was down 13 percent from 2010.

Strong start for Minnesota corn and soybean crops

According to the USDA's first official assessment of the season, nearly 100 percent of the state's record 8.7 million acres of corn is now planted. As of Sunday, 81 percent of the soybean acres were also planted.

Minn. corn farmers projected to harvest record crop

Minnesota's cornfields will average 168 bushels an acre this year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Pioneer Press reports this would be Minnesota's largest corn crop in state history and make the state the second largest corn producer in the country -- only trailing Iowa.

Farmers making progress on early corn and soybean harvests

It's only mid-September, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture says 12 percent of Minnesota's corn crop is already harvested. The Pioneer Press notes that is roughly three weeks earlier than last year. The soybean harvest is also well ahead of the five-year average with 16 percent complete.

Minnesota crops ready to harvest weeks ahead of schedule

Minnesota farmers are taking advantage of the dry weather and getting an early start on the fall harvest. Combines started rolling through corn and soybean fields last week, the Pioneer Press reports. Despite the lack of rain, Minnesota escaped the disastrous drought conditions seen in much of the nation's heartland.

April frost hurt apple crop but was not a disaster

Minnesota growers say the April frost will reduce the size of this year's apple crop but was not as damaging as many had feared. One of the most important measures of potential damage, though, won't happen until the apples are ready for tasting.