Elections: Duluth's first female mayor, St. Paul's school board, and more

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Dozens of local races were decided in voting across Minnesota on Election Day Tuesday – if you know which race you're looking for, check out the Secretary of State's Office website for results.

New Duluth mayor

One of the more high-profile elections was to choose a new mayor in Duluth to succeed Don Ness, who decided not to run for re-election after serving two terms.

The winner in that race was Emily Larson, a member of the City Council and a business consultant. She cruised to victory with about 72 percent of the vote over her opponent Chuck Horton, according to the Duluth News Tribune.

Larson is the first female mayor of the city, and after she was declared the winner she thanked voters for their support.

Ness was a popular mayor who is credited with revitalizing the city and making it a more attractive place for young professionals to live.

Duluth voters rejected a proposal that would have instituted ranked-choice voting for local elections by an overwhelming margin of 72 percent to 28 percent, according to the News Tribune.

St. Paul school board, city council

In St. Paul, voters chose new school board members: Zuki Ellis, Steve Marchese, Jon Schumacher and Mary Vanderwert

MPR calls the changes "sweeping," and the Star Tribune notes all were endorsed by the DFL Party and supported by the Caucus for Change – a teachers union-backed entity.

For the city council, most candidates won by a significant margin. The only hanging race is in Ward 2, where none of the candidates received more than 50 percent of the vote. That'll go to a runoff next Monday, the Star Tribune says.

Jane Prince (Ward 7) and Chris Tolbert (Ward 3) both racked up more than 90 percent without any specific opponent.

Dai Thao (Ward 1), Russ Stark (Ward 4), Amy Brendmoen (Ward 5) and Dan Bostrom (Ward 6) were the other victors.

More results are available at the Pioneer Press.

School funding votes

In Tuesday's election, 41 school districts asked voters to approve 51 capital levies to fund about $1.8 billion worth of projects that aim to address building improvements, security upgrades and supplies for classrooms, the Pioneer Press says.

In addition to capital levy requests, 53 districts asked voters to approve 61 operating levies, according to the Minnesota School Boards Association.

Some results from around the state:

– The Moorhead School District got a $78.28 million bond referendum approved by voters, who supported the proposal with 64 percent in favor, The Forum reports.

– Voters also approved a referendum for East Grand Forks and increased per-pupil funding for Tri-County Schools in Karlstad – but rejected requests from Detroit Lakes, Greenbush-Middle River and Dilworth-Glyndon-Felton, the Grand Forks Herald says.

– Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan School District voters approved a $180 proposal to help increase technology options and help with building upgrades, Sun This Week reports. Property taxes should go up by about $12 a month for an average home valued at $250,000, the paper says.

– Farmington residents voted to raise property taxes to pay for upping the operating levy by $433 per student, and adding a $45 million facilities bond, Sun This Week says.

Results for all local races can be found at KARE 11 and from the Secretary of State.

Special election for House District 46A seat

Residents living in parts of Hennepin County voted in a special election to fill the House District 46A seat vacated by Rep. Ryan Winkler, who resigned earlier this year to move to Europe with his family.

Peggy Flanagan, the executive director of the Children’s Defense Fund of Minnesota, won the seat. She ran unopposed.

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