Skip to main content

EpiPens cost 400 percent more and Klobuchar wants an explanation

  • Author:
  • Updated:
    Original:

The cost of EpiPens has gone up 400 percent since 2009, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar has said the "outrageous price increases" need to be "investigated and stopped."

An EpiPen is a shot people can administer themselves if they have a life-threatening allergic reaction like anaphylactic shock.

According to the senator's news release, a pack of two pens cost about $100 in 2009. Now that same pack costs $500 to $600.

Klobuchar said this increase comes as Mylan Pharmaceutical – which owns the special auto injector that makes EpiPens easy to use – became a monopoly in the market.

There used to be other similar products on the market, but one was recalled and another didn't get FDA approved.

According to Forbes and Consumer Reports, there is another generic option called Adrenaclick. It works a bit differently than the EpiPen but ultimately does the same thing with the same drug.

"Mylan Pharmaceutical is exploiting a monopoly market advantage that has fallen into its lap,” Klobuchar said in a statement.

So the senator is calling for a Judiciary Hearing on the matter as well as an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission to see if any laws have been violated, according to a Facebook post.

Then she wants the Commission to explain to Congress why prices have skyrocketed and suggest a solution. Klobuchar asks that it be done within 90 days.

The Washington Post says Sen. Charles Grassley, a Republican from Iowa, has also spoken out on the issue. So has Bernie Sanders.

https://twitter.com/SenSanders/status/766263360933466112

Why is it so expensive?

According to Forbes, the epinephrine itself isn't what's expensive – and the drug is the most important part.

What's pricey – or at least raises the costs – is the auto injector pen which only one company has the rights to.

So basically, you're paying for a system to perfectly calibrate $1 worth of epinephrine.

Forbes says there are other ways to inject the medication, like a syringe. However, it might not be as safe because the dosage isn't calibrated. Also, injecting into a vein – as opposed to muscle, like you do with an EpiPen – is more dangerous.

Additionally, a syringe full of epinephrine goes bad after about three months, according to Consumer Reports. An EpiPen lasts about a year.

Next Up

Screen Shot 2022-06-25 at 11.01.17 AM

Woman breaks free after being kidnapped and taken to Brooklyn Park

The woman was taken by force as she arrived at her work in Plymouth.

image

How the fastest animal on the planet returned to MN after local extinction

The fastest animal on Earth had once vanished from Minnesota and Wisconsin.

image

St. Paul's new 'skate trail' brings non-traditional park to life

Gateway Park is the first of four parks to open in the Highland Bridge redevelopment.

FWDqyh6UEAENgIG

80 mph winds, large hail possible with severe storms in MN

A severe thunderstorm watch is in effect for much of the state until 3 a.m. Saturday.

290376311_5009722282489162_198055240351933487_n

30 people evacuated as flooding hammers small town

It's assumed that at least eight inches of rain fell in Randall, with more heavy rain expected Friday night into Saturday morning.

Intersection in Rochester.

Boy dies in motorcycle crash in Rochester

Police are investigating as of Friday afternoon.

Tab2FileL (13)

Numerous severe storms likely in Minnesota Friday night

Watch the video for the full details with meteorologist Sven Sundgaard.

court room

Teen pleads guilty in shooting death of 15-year-old girl in Columbia Heights

Damico Jamal-Tokyo High will receive a sentence in juvenile court, along with an adult prison sentence.

Screen Shot 2022-04-25 at 11.00.01 AM

Walz wants to use surplus money to send direct payments to Minnesotans

It's a renewed effort from a previous proposal from Walz and Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan's supplemental budget in January.

Ron Johnson

Jan. 6 committee says aide for WI senator tried to give fake elector info to Pence

The attempt was discovered through text messages in the ongoing public hearing held by the Jan. 6 select committee.

Related

EpiPens cost 400 percent more and Klobuchar wants an explanation

The cost of EpiPens has gone up 400 percent since 2009, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar has said the "outrageous price increases" need to be "investigated and stopped."