Experts: Expect fewer mosquitos this year

The dry fall and light snowfall have left less standing water, which means less breeding ground for the pest and, hopefully, fewer bites. But ticks, on the other hand, will probably be thriving.
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The dry fall and light snowfall have left less standing water, which means less breeding ground for the pest and, hopefully, fewer bites. But ticks, on the other hand, will probably be thriving.

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