Experts put 900 heads together on question of how to reduce traffic fatalities - Bring Me The News

Experts put 900 heads together on question of how to reduce traffic fatalities

Traffic deaths in Minnesota reached their lowest level since World War II last year. But there's always room for improvement, as the name of the "Toward Zero Deaths" conference indicates. The event in Bloomington brings together the departments of transportation, public safety, and health.
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Traffic deaths in Minnesota reached their lowest level since World War II last year. But there's always room for improvement, as the name of the "Toward Zero Deaths" conference indicates. The event in Bloomington brings together the departments of transportation, public safety, and health.

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