Fargo Forum under fire for rejecting same-sex marriage announcement

The daily newspaper in North Dakota is reviewing its policy about publishing same-sex wedding announcements after refusing to a print an announcement for two Fargo women getting married in New York next month. The controversial decision sparked an online petition and criticism on social media from people who want the Forum of Fargo-Moorhead to reconsider. MinnPost notes several Minnesota newspapers accept same-sex marriage announcements.
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The daily newspaper in North Dakota is reviewing its policy about publishing same-sex wedding announcements after refusing to a print an announcement for two Fargo women getting married in New York next month.

The controversial decision sparked an online petition and criticism on social media from people who want the Forum of Fargo-Moorhead to reconsider.

Allison Johnson and Kelsey Smith tell Valley News Live they simply wanted to announce their love and their upcoming wedding.

Valley News Live - KVLY/KXJB - Fargo/Grand Forks

MinnPost notes at least a half-a-dozen Minnesota newspapers accept same-sex marriage announcements.

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