FDA investigating study revealing arsenic, lead in some juices

Consumer Reports claims 10 percent of the juices tested had more arsenic than is allowed in drinking water, while 25 percent had more lead. The FDA says they're looking into the report.
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Consumer Reports claims 10 percent of the juices tested had more arsenic than is allowed in drinking water, while 25 percent had more lead. The FDA says they're looking into the report.

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