FDA panel denies Medronic heart device - Bring Me The News

FDA panel denies Medronic heart device

An FDA panel rejected Medronic’s heart catheter. The Minnesota company was seeking FDA approval for the device designed to fix irregular heartbeats. But the panel concluded risks outweighed the potential benefits.
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An FDA panel rejected Medronic’s heart catheter. The Minnesota company was seeking FDA approval for the device designed to fix irregular heartbeats. But the panel concluded risks outweighed the potential benefits.

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